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Research & Cooperation


A PUBLIC LECTURE ON POTENTIAL APPLICATION OF INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND APPROPRIATE BIOTECHNOLOGY TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN CAMEROON AND INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO POVERTY ALLEVIATION.

 
 

One of the objectives of the Research Department of CATUC is to carry out community outreach programs to the grassroots. This is done through mobilization and organization of seminars, workshops and public lectures that deal with topical issues such as sustainable development, climate change, poverty alleviation and diseases among others. In order to achieve this goal, a cream of well selected persons from different walks of life and backgrounds within the country and abroad are invited to share their experiences and discoveries/findings about contemporary issues especially those that concern the development of Cameroon in particular and Africa in general. Of course, such presentations must carry with them proposed and practical solutions.

In consonance with this, the research department recently organized the first of the public lecture series which took place at the
CATUC Aula Magna on the 2nd of April 2014 under the patronage of the Vice Chancellor.

The event had as guest speaker,
Dr Jamie van Leeuven who is the Deputy Chief of Staff for Governor Hickenlooper of Colorado State and Director/Founder of Global Livingston Institute, a non-governmental organization in East Africa. His lecture was based on innovative solutions to poverty alleviation, engaging students and community leaders. He drew inspiration from his experiences in his home town of Denver and his travels in some parts of Africa.

The first speaker,
Dr. Yongabi Kenneth, Associate Professor and Director of Research at CATUC and the founder of Phytobiotechnology Research Foundation talked on: potential application of indigenous knowledge and appropriate biotechnology to sustainable development in Cameroon. The audience was awestruck at the startling revelations he made concerning our indigenous knowledge, that is, culture and agricultural systems and their effects on community health and sustainable development. He did that using facts, statistics and photographs from his rich research findings.

After the brilliant talks from these speakers there was room for reactions, comments and questions from those who were in attendance. This was followed by the closing remarks from the
Vice Chancellor Rev. Fr. Michael Niba, who expressed satisfaction and gratitude to the speakers. He also hoped that more and similar such lectures will be organized. The guests then moved over to the school canteen for lunch during which students and groups had the opportunity to meet and talk with the speakers individually and in groups.

The public lecture was heavily attended by a cross section of the society: mayors, church groups, educationists, members of the civil society, and students among others. As mentioned earlier, it is the first in a series of more public lectures that will be coming up subsequently.

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